Composition of the skin and the right of woman

COMPOSITION OF THE SKIN:
The skin is nothing to ignore when it comes to the body’s overall health. It accounts for some 12%-i6% of your body weight and if stretched out it would cover from 12 to 20 square feet and even more when it is stretched due to obesity or pregnancy.
The skin is made up of about 70% water, 25% protein, 2% lipids, and the remaining composition minerals and other trace elements.

Humans don’t shed their skin the way a snake does but because humans shed skin cells that are constantly replaced with new ones, the skin is brand new every single month. The outer surface of the skin, the epidermis, is comprised of hard, flattened dead cells. Underneath this there are larger skin cells, and under this are even more new skin cells, all of which are
constantly pushing up toward the surface. This is how we replace our skin cells constantly but it’s also how most of our body’s water is lost as those cells take hydration with them, which then evaporates.

THE LAYERS OF THE SKIN.

It’s surprising how thin the layers of our skin actually are, considering the job the skin does. Of course if the skin were any thicker than it was it couldn’t actually do that job! All our body heat would be trapped inside, causing us to overheat and the nerve endings needed for touch wouldn’t be able to reach the outer edges of the skin – not to mention how much the skin would weigh if it were any thicker than it is!

The epidermis or outer layer of the skin is about as thin as a pencil line; it is thicker on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands. The three important parts of the epidermis include a protein SKIN.

The skin is nothing to ignore when it comes to the body’s overall health. It accounts for some 12%-i6% of your body weight and if stretched out it would cover from 12 to 20 square feet and even more when it is stretched due to obesity or pregnancy.

The skin is made up of about 70% water, 25% protein, 2% lipids, and the remaining composition minerals and other trace elements.

Humans don’t shed their skin the way a snake does but because humans shed skin cells that are constantly replaced with new ones, the skin is brand new every single month.

The outer surface of the skin, the epidermis, is comprised of hard, flattened dead cells. Underneath this there are larger skin cells, and under this are even more new skin cells, all of which are constantly pushing up toward the surface. This is how we replace our skin cells constantly but it’s also how most of our body’s water is lost as those cells take hydration with them, which then evaporates.

THE LAYERS OF THE SKIN.

It’s surprising how thin the layers of our skin actually are, considering the job the skin does. Of course if the skin were any thicker than it was it couldn’t actually do that job! All our body heat would be trapped inside, causing us to overheat and the nerve endings needed for touch wouldn’t be able to reach the outer edges of the skin – not to mention how much the skin would weigh if it were any thicker than it is!

The epidermis or outer layer of the skin is about as thin as a pencil line; it is thicker on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands. The three important parts of the epidermis include a protein the skin’s surface; the three layers underneath this are called the stratum, the basal layer, and squamous cells. These layers are constantly pushing up on the uppermost layer and as they do the cells of the outer layer are shed and these newer cells become tough and hardened as they replace these cells. This layer produces collagen and elastin, two protein substances that are important for skin’s health. Elastin is what gives skin its stretchiness; as we age this substance breaks down and this is what causes sagging skin that doesn’t seem to be as firm as it once was. Those that are very overweight and obese can wear out this elastin so that their skin sags after they lose weight. Collagen is what plumps up skin and helps to keep it soft and supple. A lack of collagen means the skin feels dry and brittle.

ELEMENTS OF THE SKIN.

Collagen and elastin are the two elements that are very important for the skin’s appearance; collagen holds moisture in the skin and this helps not just with the skin’s appearance but with its health as well. Without this needed moisture skin would become tough and dry. Collagen is one of the strongest proteins in nature; the lips are made of quite a bit of collagen and this is why they can be soft to the touch but strong enough to aid in eating. Collagen and elastin in cosmetics and skincare products.

Browse the aisles of any cosmetics store or pharmacy and you’ll see many products that advertise the fact that they contain collagen and elastin. Since these components are so important for skin’s health you would think that they would do wonders for a person’s appearance.

In reality these substances are not able to penetrate the skin’s surface in order to do much good on a permanent basis. The skin gets its nourishment from the layers underneath, not from the outside. The outer layers of the skin are purposely made to be thick and tough so as to keep foreign elements out.

THE AGING SKIN.

As with so many other parts of our body, the skin’s natural defenses and processes break down as we age. This can cause all sort of imperfections and unsightly elements.

Production of collagen.

Collagen is something that needs to be continuously renewed for skin to maintain its soft feel and firmness. Without collagen and the moisture it holds skin becomes dry and sags.

The production of collagen seems to break down as we age which is partly the reason that older people have dryer skin that seems to hang from the bones.

Elastin.

Pull a rubber band back and it snaps into place. Pull it back and hold it there for several days and it stays that way.

Elastic, whether artificial in a rubber band or the natural element in our body, has a tendency to wear out after some time. Things can be stretched and held for only so long before the elastin wears out completely.

Our skin is constantly stretched over our bones and other internal organs and continues to stretch every time we move. When we bend our arms or legs, the skin stretches.

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